Wednesday, 20 September 2017

Adultery in Fiction – Do You Approve? Many Don't...



Adultery is wrong. Personally, I think cheating is one of the worst things a loved one can do to you. The pain it causes, the lives it ruins, the leftover broken trust and inability to trust again, and so much more... I wouldn't wish it on an enemy.

But it does happen. All the time. In all corners of the world.

A study in 2015 revealed that 45% of British men admitted to betraying their spouse or partner at least once, with 32% of women confessing to the same. 

Rather high percentages! No wonder writers of all genres tackle the issue of infidelity in their books one time or another. Sometimes it's the main conflict in the novel, sometimes it's on the periphery. It's very tempting to include a sub-plot focusing on a main character's past or present indiscretions. A 'will-they-won't-they-be-caught/found-out' situation.

Adultery, in some shape or form, has featured in the majority of the books I've read in the last few years. I didn't seek out these books based on the content - they just happened to include a cheater or two. I didn't take offence at the inclusion of this topic. If it made the story more gripping, more entertaining, then I didn't mind it. And I didn't think anyone else would be bothered by the subject matter either.

Until the last few months.

I've been using Goodreads quite a bit recently. Skimming through reviews of books I've read and ones I'm interested in getting my hands on, I've realised that novels featuring cheaters are a huge turn-off for certain readers. Maybe I'm really naive, or hadn't read enough reviews of books including infidelity, but I was shocked by the extent to which certain people hated books in which the hero or heroine cheat on their partners. 

Regardless of how good they thought the writing was, or how the story ended (i.e. if the adulterer learned the error in their ways and made amends), these readers wrote very negative (almost troll-like) reviews and gave those books really low ratings (mostly just 1-star) because of the adultery. Some of these reviewers said that they stopped reading the book once the cheating storyline began. One vowed never to read a book by the same author again, whereas another said they would stop reading one of their favourite authors because one of their books dealt with infidelity! These reviews got tons of 'Likes' and comments agreeing with the reviewers' sentiments.

Of course, it's their choice, their right, to stop reading a certain book or author, but for a while, I was quite taken aback by this attitude. I've mentioned already that I don't discriminate against authors and books based on adulterous characters, but many obviously do. I've noted a number of comments where readers say that they won't even pick up a book if there is a cheating plot-line in it. One even stated that they prefer books in which the hero and heroine have never had previous relationships with anyone else and don't have subsequent ones with others after meeting each other.

If I narrowed down my preferences like that, I'd think I was missing out on some entertaining reads and good writers. I prefer to read an eclectic mix of books, featuring a wide range of characters that experience a variety of emotions and hardships. Sure, I might not enjoy the fact that a character that I've become attached to gets cheated on, but I don't stop reading because of it.

This doesn't mean I approve of adulterers, in the same way that reading lots of crime/murder mystery/detective novels doesn't mean I approve of murder or have a soft spot for criminals. If I think adultery is one of the worst crimes a human being can commit, then murder is the worst of all. But I still read about crime.

So this begs the question of whether readers that refrain from books about cheaters also refrain from reading crime fiction? Maybe they don't read crime novels, but if they do, I guess it could be argued that the hero in these books is the detective working 24/7 to catch the killer before they strike again. The murderer is the villain of the story, the antagonist.

So, why will certain people (like me) read books including cheaters while others won't? I don't know about you, but I read fiction for a number of reasons. The main ones are:

-Entertainment.
-Escape reality.
-Learn about what reality is for a lot of people around the world (and adultery happens in all corners of the planet).
-As a writer, I learn more about my craft by reading the works of others, improve my writing, grow my vocabulary and also find inspiration.

To be honest, I'd get bored reading about the same types of characters in the same kinds of stories, the goody-two-shoes that never make mistakes. Humans make mistakes all the time, some bigger than others, some with more disastrous consequences than most. And I wouldn't learn a whole lot about my profession if I kept reading the same-old, same-old.

When I discussed with my husband the negative reviews left on books where the characters cheat on their partners, he joked that some people might not like reading about adultery because it makes them insecure about their partners and they don't want to think about it happening to them. I don't know if he has a point, but I do know that it's tempting to believe that bad things that happen to others won't happen to us. A 'not-in-my-back-garden' belief.

But it would be inaccurate to say that insecurity is the main reason certain readers will steer clear of books featuring adulterous protagonists.

You might wonder whether I'm discussing a troll situation. Could be, but what if it isn't? What if a significant segment of the audience, especially of the romance genre, really won't read books with a cheating story-line? Should authors be cautious when taking their novels down those routes?

I don't think they should.

My opinion is that readers have a right to choose what they read and don't read, what they like and hate (hopefully you've noticed that I haven't been preaching to everyone to keep an open mind and read all kinds of stories). In the same way, authors can write what they want. With so many books out there, both print titles and indie e-books, writers are always trying different things, seeking original angles that will make their books stand out from the ever-growing crowd. If you remove the option of an adultery story-line from all your romance novels, especially if you plan to write loads of books, then you're left with one less way of diversifying your projects.

So, keep doing what you're doing, just bear in mind that you might lose a reader or two if you weave in a cheating scenario in your book.

Thank you for reading this post. If you'd like to check out my books, click on the links below:

Chasing Pavements is book 1 of my contemporary romance series, the Soulmates Saga, available to download from:

Amazon US|   Amazon UK|   iBooks   |   B&N Nook   |   Kobo |   Smashwords 



 

Book Details

Length: 110,000 words
Genre: Contemporary Romance / Clean Romance / Diverse Romance / Interracial Romance / Romantic Drama / Women’s Fiction

Mood: Inspirational / Feel Good / Coming of Age / Dark
Content: Sexy but No explicit sex scenes / No erotica
Audience: New Adult & College / Adult / Female Readers

Recommended for: Readers that enjoy romance novels with serious issues and characters with depth. This is a story about life, love, friendship, family, music, art, destiny and soul mates.


And the first two books in my teen urban fantasy/YA paranormal romance series, the Poison Blood series, can be downloaded for free via:

Amazon USAmazon UK|   iBooks US & UK   |   B&N Nook Store   |   Smashwords





PB1 Book Details
Length: 29,000 words
Genre: YA Paranormal Romance / Teen Vampire Romance / Young Adult Paranormal Fantasy / Teen & YA Urban Fantasy / Young Adult Science Fiction & Fantasy / Supernatural Romance / Fantasy Romance
Mood: Dark / Humorous / Coming of age
Content: No violence / No explicit sex scenes / No erotica
Audience: Teen / Young Adult / New Adult / Adult
Recommended for: Readers that love all things vampires, slayers and witches!





By signing up to my mailing list, you will receive e-mails when I run free or discounted book offers and news on any new/upcoming releases. 

Monday, 11 September 2017

Should Readers Finish A Book Before Leaving #BookReviews?


"The least I think you should expect of a book review is that the reviewer has actually read the book... I don’t think it is unreasonable to expect some kind of requirement for reviewers to have at least read a book before reviewing it."

You might think that the above statement was made by an indie author who is struggling to get reviews for their books in general, let alone positive reviews, and is reacting to a 1-star review posted on Amazon or Goodreads where a reviewer said they stopped reading their book after the first chapter/first couple of pages/without finishing the book. Right?

Wrong.

This is the opinion of established author Alex Gerlis, as expressed in the below article I came across recently:

http://www.curtisbrowncreative.co.uk/alex-gerlis-vienna-spies-spy-espionage-fiction/

Alex Gerlis was a BBC journalist for over 25 years, and left in 2011 to become a full-time author. He has three books out, and they've sold over 105,000 copies between them (as of June 2017). His novels have more than 1,300 Amazon reviews, with 85% of them being four- or five-star reviews. Alex therefore isn't short for reviews. A couple of 1-star ratings from readers that haven't finished his novels won't hurt him too much, and yet, he feels that it's unfair for a reader to post a review without finishing a book. So, you can't blame indie authors for holding the same opinion.

So, what do you think? Should it be mandatory for readers to actually finish a book before writing a review and leaving a low rating? Should there be a tick box in the review writing pane on Goodreads and Amazon that asks if the reader has finished the book, so that those reviews can be filtered out, or not taken into account when calculating the average rating?

Personally, I don't rate or review a book that I didn't finish reading, not on Amazon nor on Goodreads. In my May Wrap-Up post however, I had to name the books I couldn't finish that month due to the reading slump I was suffering from. I had no choice ~ I'd mentioned planning to read them in my May Book Haul post, and when it came to my monthly wrap-up, I had to explain why there were fewer reviews that month than in previous months. 

Nonetheless, I didn't rate/review these books on Goodreads or at any other retailer website, even though they were written by established authors who wouldn't have been too hurt by a 'I couldn't finish this book' review. That's just my personal choice, which I don't enforce on anyone.

I have however, noticed on Goodreads, a number of arguments (via the comments section on the book reviews), where some readers are insisting that because a certain reviewer hadn't read more than a couple of chapters of a book, they shouldn't have posted their review, shouldn't have rated that book with a 1-star, and ought not to have expressed such negative sentiments on the book. Those targeted reviewers stormed back, saying that it's their right to express their opinions on every book they start and rate/review it accordingly, whether they finish it or not. This argument was supported by many other Goodreads users.

I don't know what the percentage is, whether the majority believe in the former or the latter, but I have noticed a lot of reviews where the reader has rated a book with a 1-star and said they didn't finish it after a few pages/chapters. I don't think I've seen a single review where a reader just wrote that they didn't get past the first chapter (for whatever reason) and therefore didn't rate it.

I've seen a couple of reviews for my own works, where the reader rated it 1-star and said they couldn't finish it. I was fine with that. I didn't complain about it to anyone who'd listen. I didn't write a blog post ranting about the unfairness of it. I thought, "fair enough". It's the reader's right to express themselves. And, I'd want to know, wouldn't I, if a significant number of readers had the same experience with my book? So, that I could work on making the early pages stronger? 

There was a 1-star review for my Poison Blood, Book 1, where the reader stopped reading the book as soon as she learned about the main character's skin type and I wrote a post about that (click here for that post). I just found it strange that someone would dislike a particular skin type so much that they'd stop reading a book that they seemed to have enjoyed up until that point. They'd even complimented the writing quality, too! I guess it's a sensitive topic for me, discriminating against people because of their skin, seen as I've had to fight against racism and prejudices all my life because of my own skin colour. Even if I am considered to be 'fair-skinned', it's clear when you look at me that my ethnicity is of South Asian origin. 



Anyway, I myself don't rate/review books that I can't finish ~ does that mean that I, deep down, think it's unfair to rate/review a book (negatively) without finishing it? Or is it because I'm an author myself, I know how 1-star ratings and reviews affect our average ratings on Goodreads and Amazon, and don't feel comfortable doing that to a fellow author?

I don't knowI see merit in both arguments. I get Alex Gerlis's argument about powering through to the end of a book, because you can sometimes be rewarded. My favourite book of 2016 was A Court of Mist and Fury (ACOMAF) by Sarah J. Maas (see my Books I Read in 2016 post), the sequel to A Court of Thorns and Roses (ACOTAR).



I struggled through the first 50-60% of ACOTAR (book 1 in the series). It was also the first Maas book I'd read. I'm glad I powered through, though; I could so easily have given up on it. I came close to giving up on it a couple of times! If I hadn't pushed to the end, however, I'd have missed out on the thrilling conclusion to that book, because it finished really strongly. More that, I'd have missed out on reading what was to become my favourite book of that year, ACOMAF, which won the 2016 Goodreads Choice Awards in the YA Fantasy and Sci-Fi category.

And yet, I also agree that if a reader doesn't finish a book and wants to 'review' it, they shouldn't be criticised for doing so. People stop reading books early on for various reasons, the main book-related ones being:
  • Far too many spelling/grammatical errors in the first few pages.
  • The writing is rubbish in their opinion.
  • The book isn’t what they expected.
  • The book isn’t what they’re looking for.
  • The book isn't their cup of tea. 
Everyone has their own experiences, expectations and perspectives, and will act on those things accordingly. For example, one thing most of my readers say about my books, both the Poison Blood Series and the Soulmates Saga, is that they like the characters and the characterisation is very good, but a recent reviewer of Poison Blood, Book 1 stated that the characters/characterisation was what they disliked most and that aspect of the novel needed work. This same reader said that she couldn’t find fault with the plot, though, yet another reviewer a while back had said that the same book had no plot. See? It's not just that a book can't please all the people all the time, but also the fact that everyone has their own way of interpreting what they read, which is shaped by their experiences and expectations.



Then there's another school of thought, the believers of which would criticise me for not making clear what books I didn't finish, because these readers believe that every reader has a responsibility to future readers of that book, to let them know that this was one they couldn't finish, and for what reason, so as to help potential readers decide whether they want to start that book or not. This opinion, I find a bit iffy. Peoples' tastes and needs are different. Just because a bunch of readers struggled with a book, doesn't mean another bunch of readers won't get hooked on it. I think most readers know this, and so how much attention will they pay to the number of readers that didn't finish a book that they're seriously interested in reading? Not too much, I'd think.



One thing that most people agree on is that a review should be an honest account of how you felt about a book, its plot and themes, its characters and the writing. It shouldn't be a way for you to get back at, or lash out at, an author you have a personal vendetta against or because you took offence at something they said (e.g. writing a negative review for a Alex Gerlis book because you disagree with him saying that readers should finish a book in order to rate/review it). These types of reviews are easy to spot, actually ~ when it's a personal attack on the author ~ regardless of how the ulterior motive of the reviewer is disguised. So, don't do that. It's not cool.

Thank you for reading this post. If you're interested in my debut novel, click the image below to learn more about it:




Like all my other books, it's also available on:
iBooks   |   B&N Nook   |   Kobo |   Smashwords 


Book Details

Length: 110,000 words
Genre: Contemporary Romance / Clean Romance / Diverse Romance / Interracial Romance / Romantic Drama / Women’s Fiction

Mood: Inspirational / Feel Good / Coming of Age / Dark
Content: Sexy but No explicit sex scenes / No erotica
Audience: New Adult & College / Adult / Female Readers

Recommended for: Readers that enjoy romance novels with serious issues and characters with depth. This is a story about life, love, friendship, family, music, art, destiny and soul mates.


And the first two books in my teen urban fantasy/YA paranormal romance series, the Poison Blood series, can be downloaded for free via:

Amazon US|  Amazon UK|   iBooks US UK   |   B&N Nook Store   |   Smashwords





PB1 Book Details

Length: 29,000 words
GenreYA Paranormal Romance / Teen Vampire Romance / Young Adult Paranormal Fantasy / Teen & YA Urban Fantasy / Young Adult Science Fiction & Fantasy / Supernatural Romance / Fantasy Romance
Mood: Dark / Humorous / Coming of age
Content: No violence / No explicit sex scenes / No erotica
Audience: Teen / Young Adult / New Adult / Adult
Recommended for: Readers that love all things vampires, slayers and witches!





By signing up to my mailing list, you will receive e-mails when I run free or discounted book offers and news on any new/upcoming releases. 

Friday, 8 September 2017

If I Say Yes (Love & Alternatives #1) FREE on Sept 9-10

As the title of this post states, my newest contemporary romance novel, If I Say Yes (Love & Alternatives #1), is FREE to download from the Amazon Kindle Store this weekend (Sept 9th and 10th) ~ so get it here!

If you want to learn a bit more about this book, below is a spoiler-free Q&A on the novel. First up, the cover and blurb:



"You know the story where the girl-next-door-type is getting married to a jerk – and she’s only marrying him because she’s given up on finding Mr. Right – only for the man of her dreams to walk into her life days before the wedding?


This is not that story.

How about the story where the girl is engaged to the nicest guy in the world, but the appearance of a mysterious hunk rocks her world off its axis and makes her wonder if she should select sexy instead of sweet?

This isn’t that story, either.

My story does however, include a man I’m going to marry and a man that…

You’ll find out soon enough..."


An unexpected marriage proposal, the perfect fiancé and engagement party, and Shell is about to embark on a new chapter of her life. But as she prepares for her happy ever after, she discovers that there are people trying to sabotage her pending nuptials.

She just didn’t think one of them might be a stalker she never knew she had, and another to come in the form of Sebastian Lowe, her fiancé’s best friend!

Seb thinks he’s saving his childhood friend from marrying the wrong girl and will stop at nothing to get his way.

But as unforeseen circumstances force Shell and Seb to work together, will she be able to prove to Seb that he’s wrong about her? Or will Seb succeed in splitting the bride and groom apart forever?



Spoiler Free Q&A

Q: What was the main inspiration behind If I Say Yes? 

A: The idea for this story just popped into my head one day, out of the blue. Of course, it’s not a completely original idea, as the female protagonist Shell alludes to in the Prologue (which is also the opening quote of the book blurb), but I can’t say for sure why it felt like such a good idea to write this story, but with my own angle on it.

When I got this idea, I was in the middle of planning/writing two other projects, both of which were in the paranormal romance/urban fantasy genre, and I didn’t think I’d be writing If I Say Yes until I was done with those, but I just felt like writing this book first. It’s one of those things that happens to authors when they have multiple story ideas but feel like writing one book more than the others.

Seb’s character however, was inspired by a real life person. A person I’ve never met, mind you, just heard about from a relative of mine. Unlike Seb who’s in his 20s, his character was inspired by a teenager actually, a boy who is best friends with my cousin’s teenage son, and he’s like the third son to my cousin, having grown up and learned about Bengali culture and tradition from an early age through his friendship with my cousin’s son.

Seen as Seb was going to be the ‘white best friend’ of Shell’s fiancé, Imran, I didn’t want to go down the predictable route where it’s a culture clash for him when he gets involved in Imran’s wedding to Shell. It would be typical to have Seb question the traditions of Bengali weddings and find everything new and amusing, not getting it, and so on. And these guys are supposed to be best friends from childhood, so wouldn’t Seb learn about Bengali culture from his friend? I’m really glad I had that random conversation with my cousin’s wife about her son’s white best friend who feels more a part of his friend’s family than his own. I guess that conversation in 2015 planted the seed for this book? 


Q: What did you enjoy most about writing If I Say Yes? 

A: Since August 2010, I’ve been spending time with the same group of characters: Mukti, Jamie and co. from my other contemporary romance series, the Soulmates Saga; and Ellie, Christian and co. from the Poison Blood Series. So, it was a pleasure creating and developing a new set of characters to fall in love with. Like making new friends, it was exciting yet nerve-wracking. There was some uncertainty, too: How will things turn out? Did I make the right choices? Will everyone else like them, too?






Q: Do you have a favourite scene in If I Say Yes? 

A: I think the scene where the stalker situation is resolved is my favourite (sorry I can’t give more details, but I’m trying to keep the spoilers out). It was a real turning point for Shell, where she got to see the true colours of the people around her. 


Q: Do you have a writing routine? Has it changed over the years? 

A: Things have changed a lot since I started writing Chasing Pavements (Soulmates Saga #1) in August 2010, my debut novel. At that time, I was single and working full-time in the financial services sector. I wrote during the evenings and weekends, and wrote at least 3,000 words each evening, and a whole lot more during the weekends.

Seven years on, I’m married and out of work due to illness. You may have read my post titled ‘When Life Imitates Art ~ An author’s tale’, where I revealed that I suffer from severe, chronic and constant lower-back pain, which worsens considerably if I sit or stand for more than 15-20 minutes. As a result, I can’t write every day, anymore. Some weeks, I don’t write at all due to the pain, and of course family responsibilities.

I wrote over 90% of If I Say Yes while lying in bed, on my stomach. It was hard on the arms and elbows ~ but that pain dissipated quickly ~ but at least my back pain didn’t worsen. Prior to April 2017, I did all my writing ~ novels and blog posts ~ in that fashion.

Then I found out I was pregnant, and it’s not ideal to be lying on your bump anymore, is it?

But I really want to write the conclusion to the Love & Alternatives duology ~ If I Say No ~ as well as those PNR/UF projects I mentioned earlier, and so I have no choice but to write whilst sitting down. Yes, the pregnancy adds to the back pain, worsens it big time, and because I can’t take my regular medication for the pain due to the pregnancy, things are pretty difficult at the moment. It’s only my love ~ and need ~ for writing that coerces me to spend a few hours each week sitting and writing. If I didn’t love it so much, I wouldn’t be doing it. The accompanying pain just wouldn’t be worth it.

And so, I try to write as much as I can, when I can, though my aim is to write at least a chapter whenever I sit down with my laptop, around 1,500 words on average (taking lots of breaks and doing lots of stretches every few minutes).

I’m not changing my writing methods though, and so, I always go over what I wrote during the previous session, to catch up with what’s happening and get back in the zone, and editing that section as I go. I think most authors do this.

Once the first rough draft is done, I go back to the beginning and do a quick revision, adding any scenes or descriptions where needed, seeing how the story flows. If I end up adding lots of new material throughout the novel, I will go back and do another quick light round of revision to see how things flow now.

Then I take a break from the manuscript. At least a month. Afterwards, the real editing begins, and I revise the manuscript to death, until I hate everything I’ve written and think its utter rubbish.

Then, another break. For a month, if I can afford it, or at least 2 weeks. A few more rounds of serious editing follows, and I only stop when I start loathing the book and don’t want to lay my eyes on it ever again.

I have become a better editor now though, so the process is more efficient ~ I’d done a lot of editing for books, research papers and blogs in my job in the financial services sector, so I can be very patient with the process.

Before the novel is ready for anyone else’s eyes however, I convert the Word file into e-book format and download it onto my Kindle or iPhone to do my own round of proof-reading, where the mistakes pop out easily. It’s also a nice change after staring at the laptop screen for months and months!

Nonetheless, the release of If I Say No will be delayed, as will the other projects I’m working on. And when the baby arrives ~ the due date is end of November 2017 ~ I don’t think I’ll have much time to do anything for myself, let alone reading and writing. We’ll see, I suppose. 


Q: How does the Love & Alternatives series compare to the Soulmates Saga? 

A: The Love & Alternatives series isn’t as dark or heavy as the Soulmates Saga, even though it does tackle a few serious issues. It also has a sweeter vibe to it, and the main characters are less troubled and tormented than those in the Soulmates Saga.




If I Say Yes is written from three characters’ POVs and in the first person, with two of those characters having more page time than the third character. It’s the first time I’ve tried this ~ the Poison Blood Series is written in the first person, but it’s mainly from Ellie’s POV, with a little from Christian thrown in here and there (though Book 2 is entirely from his POV). 

The Soulmates Saga on the other hand, is written in what I call ‘biased third-party narrative’ and though it’s mainly the lead protagonists that dominate page time, we do hear from many other characters, too. It’s biased because, when I write from Mukti’s ‘point of view’, the narrative matches her style of thinking/speaking and anything she doesn’t know, won’t feature in the sections that are from her ‘POV’. More about this in my POV post if you’re interested. Anyway, if you’ve read Dan Brown, you’ll know what I mean by biased third-party narrator; he does it so, so well! 

If I Say Yes is more fast-paced than the novels in the Soulmates Saga, but that’s not to say that Chasing PavementsMake You Feel My Love and Someone Like You are slow-burners, either. 


Q: How does Shell compare to Mukti from the Soulmates Saga? 

A: Both Shell and Mukti are young British Bangladeshi Muslims that were born and bred in London, but their personalities are very different. They’ve had different upbringings, too, their family dynamics worlds apart: Shell has a close, loving family and has a great relationship with her parents and siblings, whereas Mukti has always felt like an outsider amongst her kin, and that has solidified further when you first meet her in Chasing Pavements, due to her past and secrets.

Mukti’s past has turned her into someone that doesn’t fully integrate with the world around her ~ she just does enough to get by. However, Mukti achieves as much as, if not more than, what most young women that haven’t been through what she has in academia and the work place. Shell doesn’t have a past or any secrets ~ it’s in If I Say Yes where her past begins, so to speak. It’s a truly coming of age story for Shell.

They’re both hard-working, professional women, though Mukti is more creative and artistic than Shell.





Q: How do Seb and Imran compare to Jamie from the Soulmates Saga? 

A: When you first meet these characters, I’d say Seb and Imran are more instantly likeable than Jamie, Imran more than Seb. The male characters in If I Say Yes are more open and honest with the reader, and have a great friendship with each other, whereas Jamie is an introverted recluse. Jamie goes through more change and character development in Chasing Pavements though, and you do fall in love with him by the end of the book.

The two best friends in If I Say Yes are so different from each other in terms of personality ~ Seb is loud, brash and bit of a commitment-phobe; Imran is the deep thinker, quiet, reserved, but he embraces the idea of settling down with his fiancé, Shell, the perfect woman for him ~ and they couldn’t be more different from Jamie. However, Jamie is like Imran when it comes to settling down; he’s ready for the happy ever after with the woman that he loves. She just needs to get to that phase, too.

That’s it folks. Hope you enjoyed the interview. If you’re interested in If I Say Yes, it’s free to down this Saturday and Sunday (Sept 9th and 10th) from Amazon Kindle here.

Chasing Pavements is available at all your favourite retailers:

Amazon US|   Amazon UK|   iBooks   |   B&N Nook   |   Kobo |   Smashwords 


And the first two books in my teen urban fantasy/YA paranormal romance series, the Poison Blood series, can be downloaded for free via:

Amazon US|  Amazon UK|   iBooks US UK   |   B&N Nook Store   |   Smashwords






PB1 Book Details
Length: 29,000 words
GenreYA Paranormal Romance / Teen Vampire Romance / Young Adult Paranormal Fantasy / Teen & YA Urban Fantasy / Young Adult Science Fiction & Fantasy / Supernatural Romance / Fantasy Romance
Mood: Dark / Humorous / Coming of age
Content: No violence / No explicit sex scenes / No erotica
Audience: Teen / Young Adult / New Adult / Adult
Recommended for: Readers that love all things related to the Chosen One, vampires, slayers and witches!



By signing up to my mailing list, you will receive e-mails when I run free or discounted book offers and news on any new/upcoming releases.