Saturday, 18 November 2017

My Bookish Pet Peeves (Part II)

In Part I of this post, I talked about my book-specific pet peeves, but there are a few other things that annoy me when it comes to books and reading, like other peoples' bookish pet peeves :) Again, I mean no offence to anyone; these are just things that peeve me off as a reader. Everyone is entitled to their own pet peeves, but its okay for people to find those thoughts annoying. As with Part I, I'm writing this post as a reader, a bookworm, not as an author.

So here they are, in no particular order of annoying-ness:

"I hate insta-love; it's just not possible. But shape-shifting werewolves are completely realistic!"

When readers say they hate insta-love (love at first sight between two characters) "because it's just not possible", I think to myself, "Because immortal vampires and shape-shifting werewolves are possible, right?" I find it funny that some readers will believe in mythical beings when they're reading fantasy, but not believe that these supernatural creatures can fall in love at first sight, too, that it's unrealistic for them to do so.

Personally, I don't have an issue with insta-love ~ I think it would be quite boring if characters in books only fell in love in just a limited number of ways, like friends first, then lovers, or bickering rivals first then lovers ~ and I don't think insta-love plot lines are as common as some readers think. Sometimes, people are so ready to say, "That's insta-love and I hate insta-love" that they miss the bit where the author is trying to convey that the character hasn't fallen in love at first sight, but they've instantly found someone physically attractive.

Insta-attraction happens all the time in real life. Who hasn't passed some hot guy or girl in the street and thought, "Wow, they're really cute!"? Does that mean we've fallen in love at first sight? No. Because we have indeed passed them on the street. We didn't spin in the opposite direction to where we were heading to run after them. But if this were someone you came into regular contact with, like if you were attracted to someone at work, then you might get all flustered and shy or whatever each time you saw them. It still doesn't mean it's love. Just attraction.

There's a book (I won't name it, so not to spoil it for you) where a vampire girl meets a human and finds him attractive, but because she's a vampire and all her reactions and emotions are magnified and intensified in her immortal life and body, the crush feels bigger than it actually is. She even goes on to say that she probably thinks he's simply cute but because everything is more intense for her, it feels epic, when in reality, it's just a little crush. That still didn't stop one reader from labelling that as insta-love. This review was the first that I noticed for this book where a reader thought insta-love was in play.

Wait. That's probably another pet peeve of mine ~ when readers label an interaction between two characters as insta-love when it's not that at all. :)




"I hate love triangles, but I loved the love triangle in Book X."

I don't have anything against love triangles in books or films; in fact, I love a good love triangle if it's done well. But a lot of readers hate love triangles and think it's over-done, esp. in YA fantasy/paranormal romance. That's fine. We don't all have to like the same thing.

But when readers say that authors only go with love triangles because "they can't think of anything else to add drama and conflict to their novel"... that assumption peeves me off. Because, unless we know the author and have asked them about the inclusion of a love triangle, we don't know why they wrote their story the way they did. Sorry, I do get a little sensitive when Stephenie Meyer gets criticised, don't I? :)

What annoys me even more is when readers say that they hate love triangles in general but loved it in only one book/series because it was "believable" and "made sense". Well, perhaps the issue isn't love triangles themselves, but the fact that most of the love triangles you've read about didn't make sense to you, or you didn't think they were well-executed? Or maybe, you just loved that one book so much that even the much hated love-triangle trope couldn't put you off?




"I'd have given this book 5-stars but Jane didn't end up with John like I'd 'shipped', so... 3.5-stars!"


This is linked to love triangles ~ despite readers' protests, authors/publishers are still churning out books with love triangles in them! When there are multiple love interests for a protagonist, it's now very common for camps to form amongst fans. Readers will 'ship' the lead character with the love interest that they like the best. Remember Team Edward vs. Team Jacob from the Twilight Saga? It's fun and gets readers talking about books. That's great!

But I get irritated when I see reviews where readers specifically rate a book down because their 'ship' didn't work out in the end. Even if it made sense for the protagonist or for the series as a whole. If it makes sense and makes for a good ending, the book shouldn't be rated down only because you didn't 'ship' the couple that was 'endgame'. Everyone is different, and we're attracted to different things, so it's natural that we might not prefer the love interest that the lead character chooses, because, well, their tastes in men/women are different to ours.

And so what if the protagonist chose the person that wasn't best for them? It's their decision to make, and the author makes it for them based on what they believe the protagonist will do. Besides, do we humans always make the right choices when it comes to love, partners and relationships? No. Do we always love the people that are good for us? No. We love who we love.

In books, however, the protagonists usually end up choosing the person they love most and want most ~ and that person may not always be, on paper, right for them or the best person for them, but it's the person they think will make them happiest. So, I don't think it's fair to rate down an otherwise 4- or 5-star read just because you didn't fancy the same guy/girl as the hero/heroine.




"I'd have given this book 5-stars but John died in the end, so... 3.5-stars!"

When readers rate down a book only because a beloved character died towards the end of the novel or a series, it just peeves me off. Readers hate it even more if it's the love interest that dies. Don't get me wrong, I hated it when three of my favourite characters in Harry Potter were killed off by the end of the series, but I didn't mark the books down because of those deaths. Everything that happens in a book is for a reason and it's there for our reading experience. I think it's unfair to knock points off simply and only because you didn't agree/like it when the author did something they thought was necessary for the book.

At the same time, some readers criticise authors for not killing off characters when they think the author should have done so, because "it's a dangerous world and it's unrealistic for every important character to survive".

Apparently, Stephenie Meyer said she doesn't want to write a sequel(s) to her sci-fi novel The Host because it's set in a dangerous world and important, beloved characters would have to die to make it realistic and she didn't want to kill her darlings. So, she decided not to write a sequel (yet). And readers have criticised her for that, saying that she should be brave enough to do what's necessary. Yes, she has to be really brave, seen as there are some who will unfairly rate her sequels down if one of the characters she kills off is a favourite of theirs. As far as I'm concerned, Stephenie can decide not to write a sequel for whatever reason. It's her choice. Obviously, I'm Team Stephenie all the way :)

So, that's it from me for now. Here are some popular BookTubers sharing their bookish pet peeves if you're interested in watching:

Katytastic
Jesse The Reader
PeruseProject

Thank you for reading this post. If you're interested in my debut novel, Chasing Pavements (Soulmates Saga, Book 1) click here to learn more about it.


Like all my other books, it's also available on:
iBooks   |   B&N Nook   |   Kobo |   Smashwords 

Book Details
Length: 110,000 words
Genre: Contemporary Romance / Clean Romance / Diverse Romance / Interracial Romance / Romantic Drama / Women’s Fiction

Mood: Inspirational / Feel Good / Coming of Age / Dark
Content: Sexy but No explicit sex scenes / No erotica
Audience: New Adult & College / Adult / Female Readers

Recommended for: Readers that enjoy romance novels with serious issues and characters with depth. This is a story about life, love, friendship, family, music, art, destiny and soul mates.


And the first two books in my teen urban fantasy/YA paranormal romance series, the Poison Blood series, can be downloaded for free via:

Amazon US|  Amazon UK|   iBooks US UK   |   B&N Nook Store   |   Smashwords






PB1 Book Details
Length: 29,000 words
GenreYA Paranormal Romance / Teen Vampire Romance / Young Adult Paranormal Fantasy / Teen & YA Urban Fantasy / Young Adult Science Fiction & Fantasy / Supernatural Romance / Fantasy Romance
Mood: Dark / Humorous / Coming of age
Content: No violence / No explicit sex scenes / No erotica
Audience: Teen / Young Adult / New Adult / Adult
Recommended for: Readers that love all things related to the Chosen One, vampires, slayers and witches!



By signing up to my mailing list, you will receive e-mails when I run free or discounted book offers and news on any new/upcoming releases. I won't bombard you with e-mails otherwise.

Tuesday, 14 November 2017

My Bookish Pet Peeves (Part I)

Authors are avid readers, too. Well, most of us are. And when we read, we read wearing many hats. Sometimes we wear the Author Hat ~ we look at the book as a author/writer. This is when we admire and envy the language and style of writing, or shake our heads and roll our eyes at poor editing (or the lack of any editing) or wonder why a book clearly hasn't been proofread.

We also put on the Reader Hat ~ when we're like the average bookworm or fiction enthusiast, and we get immersed in the story and let it entertain us. When we're just a reader, we can have issues with the plot, the characters and other aspects of the book, similar to most book fans everywhere. And we can have bookish pet peeves, just like the typical reader. So, I thought I'd share some of my pet peeves this week.

I'm writing this post as a reader and lover of books, not as an author. I mean no offence with this post. These are just some of the bookish things that annoy me and it's fine if they don't irritate you, or even if these are your favourite bookish things. Just my opinion. You are, like me, entitled to have your own thoughts and pet peeves! But do comment below if these things peeve you off, too.

Now, without further ado, here are my book-related pet peeves, in no particular order of how much they annoy me:

Is this the first or third book in the series? It's not clear on the cover or in the front/back matter, grr! 

So, you're at the library or bookstore and you've picked up a book you think you're going to enjoy reading. You're pretty sure it's part of a series ~ it might even say so on the cover e.g. "A Poison Blood Novel" ~ but it doesn't say anywhere on the book where this novel falls within the series! You have to use Google or go to your Goodreads profile, type in the name of the book to find out if it's the first or second in a series. If it's book 1, great! But if it's not the series opener and you can't find the first book of the series nearby, you just wasted precious book browsing time doing research!

This issue is more common with print editions; e-books tend to include these details on the retailer's website.




Why was this story dragged out into a trilogy when it could have been told in one book?

I think there are readers that like a good long series, to spend more time with characters that they have grown to love, and explore a world that fascinates them, but I think that if a story is best told as a standalone, it shouldn't be dragged out into a trilogy (or more).

It's different with e-books, though. These are usually priced low, so you might end up spending less on an entire 4-, 5- or 6-book e-book series than you do on one print paperback book. It's annoying spending up to $30/£30 on hardback or paperback editions of a series that you thought could have been told in a standalone.




So, married men only have affairs if they have problems at home? Really?

This isn't specific to books. Films do it, too. And I'm just fed up and bored of this. Every book I've read in the last few years where a married man has an affair with another woman ~ and I mean affair, not a one-night stand; you know, sneaking around, meeting in hotels, secret texts and calls etc. ~ it is when the wife is bossy or nagging or doesn't understand or appreciate him. Basically, the marriage is on the rocks or heading there, and so the husband seeks solace in another woman's arms.

I guess authors do this so that the readers don't hate the male lead too much, so they sympathise with him even when he's doing something very wrong ~ "Can you blame him? His wife was horrible to him!" ~ but does it have to be like that in every book where there's an affair?

I'm sure there are books where a husband or wife stumbles into an extra-marital affair even when they are quite happily married ~ and I'm sure it happens in real life, too ~ but I just haven't read one like that.




How sweet, Little Miss Perfect is adored by all apart from one girl ~ her love rival. Ugh!

This is becoming less common in newer releases, but I've read loads of books where the female lead is liked by everyone, apart from the one mean girl at school, who happens to be the love rival. The heroine is so lovely and perfect that no one has a bad thing to say about her, and if she hadn't caught the hero's eye, the mean girl would have befriended her, too! So unrealistic.

Oh great, I can just skip to the end of the book to see how it ends because the blurb's given me a good run-down of what happens in the first two thirds of the book! Not!

I hate writing detailed blurbs/book descriptions for my novels, because I want readers to discover the story as the characters do, with each chapter. I don't want to give hardly anything away in the blurb, but I know it's a necessary evil that I have to conform to :) And with a heavy heart, I've started writing book descriptions that summarise a big chunk of the story line because that's what is expected by the market. But I'm not very happy about doing it! :)




In the same way, when I'm browsing through iBooks, the Kindle Store, or my local library, I don't like it when the blurb tells me the whole story, bar the ending. A good example is the blurb for The Substitute by Denise Grover Swank. I may have enjoyed the book more if the description hadn't summarised the first three quarters of the novel. What's worse, I had to follow a similar formula when I wrote the blurb for my book If I Say Yes (Love & Alternatives, Book 1).

So, those were my book-specific pet peeves, but there are a few other things that annoy me, as a reader, when it comes to books, like other peoples' bookish pet peeves :) I'll talk about those in Part II of this post next week.

Thank you for reading this post. If you're interested in my debut novel, Chasing Pavements (Soulmates Saga, Book 1) click here to learn more about it.


Like all my other books, it's also available on:
iBooks   |   B&N Nook   |   Kobo |   Smashwords 

Book Details
Length: 110,000 words
Genre: Contemporary Romance / Clean Romance / Diverse Romance / Interracial Romance / Romantic Drama / Women’s Fiction

Mood: Inspirational / Feel Good / Coming of Age / Dark
Content: Sexy but No explicit sex scenes / No erotica
Audience: New Adult & College / Adult / Female Readers

Recommended for: Readers that enjoy romance novels with serious issues and characters with depth. This is a story about life, love, friendship, family, music, art, destiny and soul mates.


And the first two books in my teen urban fantasy/YA paranormal romance series, the Poison Blood series, can be downloaded for free via:

Amazon US|  Amazon UK|   iBooks US UK   |   B&N Nook Store   |   Smashwords






PB1 Book Details
Length: 29,000 words
GenreYA Paranormal Romance / Teen Vampire Romance / Young Adult Paranormal Fantasy / Teen & YA Urban Fantasy / Young Adult Science Fiction & Fantasy / Supernatural Romance / Fantasy Romance
Mood: Dark / Humorous / Coming of age
Content: No violence / No explicit sex scenes / No erotica
Audience: Teen / Young Adult / New Adult / Adult
Recommended for: Readers that love all things related to the Chosen One, vampires, slayers and witches!



By signing up to my mailing list, you will receive e-mails when I run free or discounted book offers and news on any new/upcoming releases. I won't bombard you with e-mails otherwise.

Monday, 6 November 2017

Writing A Negative #Review For My Book

Ever since I've started using Goodreads on a regular basis, I've been reading a lot of the reviews posted on the site. With novels that I've enjoyed, I check out the negative comments, and with books I didn't love, I skim through the 5-star reviews to see what the fans are saying.

I think I've read enough negative reviews to get a good idea of the common trends that are present in 1- or 2-star reviews (i.e. the types of things that come up a lot) and I thought it would be fun to take inspiration from such reviews and write a negative review for one of my own books. Yes, my definition of 'fun' may not be the same as everyone else's :)

Every now and then, I like to be a little cheeky and write posts like 'Don't Read My Books If' and 'I Would Never Write' just to mix it up. Us authors get asked so often about why people should read our books and we're so used to bigging up our projects, that it's refreshing to take the mick out of ourselves once in a while. Again, my definition of 'refreshing' might not be the same as yours :)

But I didn't stop there. No, I found myself creating an 'alter-ego' to write a negative review for Chasing Pavements, a contemporary romance novel set in LondonOnce I started thinking about my alter-ago's 'review' and how she'd describe herself, she sort of took on a life of her own (like a lot of my characters do) and I just went with it. 

In this fake review, I've exaggerated some of the common themes that I've seen in negative reviews, and in places I'm just making fun of myself and my book and trying to be funny :) I mean no offence. I'm not trying to make fun of anyone, apart from myself. This isn't a retaliation to a negative review of my own projects or a favourite book of mine, although I know that celebrities (like Russell Brand, who I love) and YouTubers make sketches/videos reacting to hate mail and negative comments that they get.

I've made up the name of my book blogger as well as the other bloggers that have 'commented' on the review, because what's a negative review without a few supportive comments? Any resemblance to real people, dead or alive, is purely coincidental and not intentional.

So, here's introducing, Jessie Reads It All:



Hi, I'm Jessica, but you can call me Jessie Reads It All. Because I really do read a lot! Sometimes, I think I'm more of a bookworm than I am human. I live, breathe, drink and eat books. The only thing I love more than a great book is a bad book, as that means I can do a public service to book lovers everywhere and warn them about the books they should absolutely avoid. That's one of the reasons I started this book blog, and also to share my love for reading. I read between 100 to 200 books every year and still don't think there are enough hours in a day for reading. And my TBR hardly goes down! And tbh, I'm fine with that. It means I'll never run out of books to devour.

----- Monday, 6 November 2017 -----

Happy Monday, bookworms, welcome back to my blog. I have another book review for you this week, so check it out below. Don't forget to share/comment if you like it :)


Book: Chasing Pavements (Soulmates Saga #1)
Author: Neha Yazmin 
Rating: 1 'I can't believe I actually managed to finish it' star

Review:

So, this is a 'troubled boy meets troubled girl' story. Because there aren't enough of these types of books in the world. That was me being sarcastic, btw. I mean, honestly, why did this author bother to write this story when there are already so many bestselling books following this theme? Waste of time, if you ask me. She probably just wanted to write a book that no one would read. Either that, or she's never read a contemporary romance novel before, because this book doesn't feel like other books in this genre. And I have read a LOT of books in this genre! I'll be touching on this more later in my review.

Anyway. The H is a guy called Jamie, who is pretty much a total d**k, really. And he's not even muscley or alpha. If he was, it could have redeemed him in my eyes. If you're writing about a jerk, you might as well give him muscles and pecks. I mean, give me a alpha male hunk, the only type of H I want to read about, not this wiry-legged singer-songwriter that does the opposite of what I expect him to do. Like I said, I've read a lot of books in this genre and so my expectations stem from my vast experience of fictional Hs. Though the H's actions do make sense based on his character profile and aren't out of character. Kudos to the author for that, I suppose.

As for the h Mukti... The author needs to decide how she wants to spell this name, as I saw it spelt Mookti in one chapter. I mean, come on, if you can't spell your protagonist's name correctly, or consistently throughout your book, what confidence can I have that you'll deliver a good novel? Why should I even read anything you've written? Thankfully, the author does eventually stick with the spelling Mukti after one chapter with all the Mooktis.

Now, Mukti/Mookti has been through a lot but she hardly ever complains about it, which was totally unrealistic tbh. With a past like hers, she should have moaned about it at least three times as much as she does, if you look at other novels where the h has a heartbreaking history.

But I must admit that the way she deals with the sh*t that happens to her in this book is admirable and shows strength and resilience. That was probably my favourite thing about this book. The only thing I liked, really. So, not a lot at all. As for the things I hated in this book... we'll be here forever if I had to list them all. But I can't not mention that the author just goes on and on about the H's eyes! They're a pretty colour and the only things about him that are expressive, so what? Get over it. They're just eyes. Another thing that annoyed was that the author wrote out numbers, like twenty instead of 20 and so on, but she wasn't CONSISTENT (I see a pattern here with her writing) like when the number was at the start of a sentence it would be written out but if it was in the middle of the sentence then it would be a digit. I mean, what is up with that? Sheesh. 

At this point in my reviews, I'd be critiquing the plot, but what's the point with this book? As I said earlier, it's a 'troubled boy meets troubled girl' love story, what more is there to say about the plot? They meet. They fall in love. They overcome various obstacles to 'get together'. And have their HEA. Original, NOT.

And the writing... it's nothing special. I've read tons of books of this level of quality so it's nothing I'm going to scream and shout about. Luckily though, there weren't any sections of descriptions that were trying to be all poetic and sweeping (which I find downright annoying), and just as well, because this book has a bunch of songs in it, the lyrics of Jamie's songs. They didn't impress me, though; the author failed in giving me a good idea of how those songs sound musically, like the tune and melody etc.

So it's no surprise that I didn't like this book. A 1-star rating for this is generous of me. What was there to like, anyway? The H and h are not like the ones I'm used to, not like the characters that dominate contemporary romance. I still can't believe that I finished a book where the H wasn't an alpha male! The writing was so-so and the plot revolved around the relationship between the H and h. What's so unique about that?

Okay, so you do hear a little from the H's family, but nothing from the h's family. And why wasn't the whole thing from just Mukti's POV, anyway? I mean, Jamie hardly talks out loud or tells Mukti his true thoughts, surely it would have made more sense to just not delve into his head at all, seen as Mukti had no idea what was going on inside his head most of the time. That way, the reader would be able to relate to Mukti. Sure, there were scenes with the H that the h wasn't aware of and that the reader needed to know about, but that could have been resolved with a info dump at the end like I've seen in a lot of books. Or maybe not, seen as Jamie isn't exactly verbose. What can I say, I prefer first person POV instead of multiple POV that's not in even in the first person.

At the end of the day, I don't recommend this book to any of you guys that follow my blog because I know you guys like the same books as me and you won't like this one. Frankly, I don't know if this book has a audience, it's just not what romance readers are used to.

Sorry, but this book just ain't for me. Don't know why she bothered writing two more books about Jamie and Mukti (she's either very vain or feels very strongly that these characters merit a whole trilogy), but I wish her luck and hope she stuck with a fixed spelling for her h's name in subsequent books.

Finally, because I do this for all the books I review, and to be CONSISTENT in my blog, below are the buy links for Chasing Pavements. Until next time my lovely people, keep reading it all :) xxx


Amazon  |  iBooks   |   B&N Nook   |   Kobo |   Smashwords 


COMMENTS: 19

Bookish Bekky: Great review, Jessie! You're right, I won't like this book.
--Jessie Reads It All: Thanks hun, glad you liked it x

The Bookmark Hoarder: No way, really? OMG. I swear some people should NOT be allowed to publish books if they can't spell their characters' names. What a joke! Definitely steering clear of this author!
--Jessie Reads It All: Haha, I know, right?

Angela Japp: @TheBookmarkHoarder Exactly! I mean spelling a word wrong here and there is acceptable, it happens, but the least I expect from an author is that they know how to spell their characters' names right. *shakes head, appalled*
--Jessie Reads It All: So true....

Dominique Bergese: Great review, as always Jessie :) About the name spelling, I think it was an intentional misspelling by the author?? I haven't read this book (only a preview of it at the end of one of her other books) and it's the h's colleague that 'spells' it Mookti because that's how it sounds to him when she says her name :)
--Jessie Reads It All: Just re-read that section and you're right. He assumes her name is spelt Mookti based on how she pronounced it, but 'spells' it right after she corrects him. I must have skipped this part by mistake or forgotten about it (the book wasn't memorable by a long stretch!). I'll add a 'EDIT note' at the end of the review to clarify this. Thanks for pointing it out, Dominique.
P.S. Which book of hers did you read?
--Dominique Bergese: You're welcome :) I read her poison blood series. It's a vampire urban fantasy. As soon as I rated the first book, the author sent me a friend request on GR (!) and followed me, probably to see how I rate the other books in the series.....
--Jessie Reads It All: OMG she did that to me, too! A few hours after I added Chasing Pavements as 'currently reading' she started following my reviews on GR. How creepy!! Needless to say, she didn't hit Like for my 1-star review of her book, though ;)
--Can't Have Too Many Book Boyfriends: Woah, there should be a law against authors stalking their readers online.....
--Selene Applegate: @Can'tHaveTooManyBookBoyfriends Well I wouldn't mind getting stalked by my favourite authors lol :)
--Jessie Reads It All@Selene True about the fave authors, but when it's some random unknown indie author stalking you, it's totally creepy.
--Patty Singh: Ah hun, you should block this author. I know GR lets you block users...
--Jessie Reads It All: @Patty LOL! I'm not that rude :) :) But thanks hun xxx

All Things Books: Love the review, Jessie! Does anyone else get annoyed when romance authors go on and on about the Hero's body? Like, you've described his amazing abs in great detail in Chapter 1 when you first introduced him, then again in Chapter 2 when the Heroine first saw him, then again in Chapters 3, 4, and 5... do you have to keep drooling over his body every two paragraphs throughout the whole book? Uh, no! Repeat yourself much?! Did this book have this?
--Jessie Reads It All@AllThingsBooks No - because the H doesn't have a hot body.

Marla Robins: Totally agree on the alpha male thing. I need a hunk or two in my new adult romances and if this one doesn't have one, I'm going to pass on it. Thanks for the heads up, Jessie :)
--Jessie Reads It All: My pleasure, hun x

----- End -----

Thank you for reading this post. If you're interested in my debut novel, Chasing Pavements (Soulmates Saga, Book 1), after that review, click here to learn more about it.


Like all my other books, it's also available on:
iBooks   |   B&N Nook   |   Kobo |   Smashwords 


Book Details
Length: 110,000 words
Genre: Contemporary Romance / Clean Romance / Diverse Romance / Interracial Romance / Romantic Drama / Women’s Fiction

Mood: Inspirational / Feel Good / Coming of Age / Dark
Content: Sexy but No explicit sex scenes / No erotica
Audience: New Adult & College / Adult / Female Readers

Recommended for: Readers that enjoy romance novels with serious issues and characters with depth. This is a story about life, love, friendship, family, music, art, destiny and soul mates.


And the first two books in my teen urban fantasy/YA paranormal romance series, the Poison Blood series, can be downloaded for free via:

Amazon US|  Amazon UK|   iBooks US UK   |   B&N Nook Store   |   Smashwords






PB1 Book Details
Length: 29,000 words
GenreYA Paranormal Romance / Teen Vampire Romance / Young Adult Paranormal Fantasy / Teen & YA Urban Fantasy / Young Adult Science Fiction & Fantasy / Supernatural Romance / Fantasy Romance
Mood: Dark / Humorous / Coming of age
Content: No violence / No explicit sex scenes / No erotica
Audience: Teen / Young Adult / New Adult / Adult
Recommended for: Readers that love all things related to the Chosen One, vampires, slayers and witches!




By signing up to my mailing list, you will receive e-mails when I run free or discounted book offers and news on any new/upcoming releases. I won't bombard you with e-mails otherwise.